Superior Efficacy: More Patients Treated With ACTEMRA Achieved Sustained Remission at 52 Weeks1


 

The ACTEMRA + steroid* taper arms demonstrated superiority across GiACTA primary and key secondary endpoints vs the placebo + steroid taper arms 1,3

GiACTA was the first successful pivotal study in GCA 4

  • A randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase III superiority study to assess ACTEMRA efficacy and safety in 251 GCA patients 1,5
  • ACTEMRA 162 mg SC QW or Q2W was compared with placebo + 26- or + 52-week steroid taper 1
  • The primary endpoint was sustained remission from Week 12 through Week 52 comparing ACTEMRA + 26-week steriod taper arms to placebo + 26-week steroid taper arm 3
  • The key secondary endpoint was sustained remission from Week 12 through Week 52 comparing ACTEMRA + 26-week steroid taper arms to placebo + 52-week steroid taper arm 3

Sustained Remission: ITT Population 2

  • In the primary endpoint, the percentage of patients achieving sustained remission was 4x larger in the ACTEMRA arms vs the comparator 1,2

*Prednisone.

  • Remission was defined as absence of flare and normalization of CRP to <1 mg/dL. A single CRP elevation (≥1 mg/dL) was not considered a flare unless CRP remained elevated (≥1 mg/dL) at the next study visit 2,5
  • Sustained remission was defined as remission from Week 12 through Week 52 and adherence to the prednisone taper 5
  • GCA flare, determined by the efficacy assessor, was defined as the recurrence of GCA signs or symptoms or ESR elevation to ≥30 mm/h attributable to GCA 5

CRP=C-reactive protein; ESR=erythrocyte sedimentation rate; Q2W=every-other-week dose; QW=every-week dose; SC=subcutaneous.

Select Important Safety Information: BOXED WARNING

  • Serious infections leading to hospitalization or death including tuberculosis (TB), bacterial, invasive fungal, viral, and other opportunistic infections have occurred in patients receiving ACTEMRA.
  • If a serious infection develops, interrupt ACTEMRA until the infection is controlled.
  • Perform test for latent TB; if positive, start treatment for TB prior to starting ACTEMRA.
  • Monitor all patients for active TB during treatment, even if initial latent TB test is negative.

Please see throughout for additional safety information, and full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNING.

Patients treated in the placebo + steroid taper arms received a higher cumulative steroid dose than those in the ACTEMRA + steroid taper arms 1

Median Cumulative Steroid Dose by Visit 2

  • The estimated annual cumulative prednisone dose was lower in the 2 ACTEMRA dose groups (medians of 1887 mg and 2207 mg on ACTEMRA QW and Q2W, respectively) relative to the placebo arms (medians of 3804 mg and 3902 mg on placebo + 26-week prednisone taper and placebo + 52-week prednisone taper, respectively). 1

aSteroid taper complete in both ACTEMRA arms.

Overall Safety Was Generally Consistent With the Known Safety Profile of ACTEMRA 1

There was an overall higher incidence of infections in GCA patients for both ACTEMRA and steroid taper arms.

No new safety signals were observed in either ACTEMRA + steroid taper arm. 2

aReported in ≥1% of patients overall.

GI=gastrointestinal; PBO=placebo; SAE=serious adverse event; SI=serious infection; SOC=system organ class.

INDICATIONS

ACTEMRA is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who have had an inadequate response to one or more Disease-Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (DMARDs).

ACTEMRA is indicated for the treatment of giant cell arteritis (GCA) in adult patients.

ACTEMRA is indicated for the treatment of active polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis in patients 2 years of age and older.

ACTEMRA is indicated for the treatment of active systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis in patients 2 years of age and older.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

BOXED WARNING

RISK OF SERIOUS INFECTIONS:

Patients treated with ACTEMRA are at increased risk for developing serious infections that may lead to hospitalization or death, including tuberculosis (TB), bacterial, invasive fungal, viral, or other opportunistic infections. If a serious infection develops, interrupt ACTEMRA until the infection is controlled.

Reported infections include:

  • Active tuberculosis, which may present with pulmonary or extrapulmonary disease. Patients should be tested for latent tuberculosis before ACTEMRA use and during therapy. Treatment for latent infection should be initiated prior to ACTEMRA use.
  • Invasive fungal infections, including candidiasis, aspergillosis, and pneumocystis. Patients with invasive fungal infections may present with disseminated, rather than localized, disease.
  • Bacterial, viral and other infections due to opportunistic pathogens.

The risks and benefits of treatment with ACTEMRA should be carefully considered prior to initiating therapy in patients with chronic or recurrent infection.

Patients should be closely monitored for the development of signs and symptoms of infection during and after treatment with ACTEMRA, including the possible development of tuberculosis in patients who tested negative for latent tuberculosis infection prior to initiating therapy.

CONTRAINDICATION

ACTEMRA is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to ACTEMRA.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Gastrointestinal Perforations

Events of gastrointestinal (GI) perforation have been reported in clinical trials, primarily as complications of diverticulitis in RA patients. Use ACTEMRA with caution in patients who may be at increased risk for GI perforation. Promptly evaluate patients presenting with new-onset abdominal symptoms for early identification of GI perforation.

Laboratory Parameters

Laboratory monitoring is recommended due to potential consequences of treatment-related laboratory abnormalities in neutrophils, platelets, lipids, and liver function tests. Dosage modifications may be required.

Neutropenia: Treatment with ACTEMRA was associated with a higher incidence of neutropenia. It is not recommended to initiate ACTEMRA treatment in patients with a low neutrophil count i.e., absolute neutrophil count (ANC) less than 2000 per mm3. In patients who develop an ANC less than 500 per mm3 treatment is not recommended.

Thrombocytopenia: Treatment with ACTEMRA was associated with a reduction in platelet counts. It is not recommended to initiate ACTEMRA in patients with a platelet count below 100,000 per mm3. In patients who develop a platelet count less than 50,000 per mm3, treatment is not recommended.

Elevated Liver Enzymes: Treatment with ACTEMRA was associated with a higher incidence of transaminase elevations. These elevations did not result in apparent permanent or clinically evident hepatic injury in clinical trials. Increased frequency and magnitude of these elevations was observed when potentially hepatotoxic drugs (e.g., methotrexate) were used in combination with ACTEMRA.
– It is not recommended to initiate ACTEMRA treatment in patients with elevated transaminases ALT or AST >1.5x ULN. In patients who develop elevated ALT or AST >5x ULN, treatment is not recommended.

Lipid Abnormalities: Treatment with ACTEMRA was associated with increases in lipid parameters such as total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterols, and/or HDL cholesterol.

Immunosuppression

The impact of treatment with ACTEMRA on the development of malignancies is not known, but malignancies were observed in clinical studies with ACTEMRA. ACTEMRA is an immunosuppressant, and treatment with immunosuppressants may result in an increased risk of malignancies.

Hypersensitivity Reactions

Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, have been reported in association with ACTEMRA and anaphylactic events with a fatal outcome have been reported with intravenous infusion of ACTEMRA. ACTEMRA for intravenous use should only be infused by a healthcare professional with appropriate medical support to manage anaphylaxis. For ACTEMRA subcutaneous injection, advise patients to seek immediate medical attention if they experience any symptoms of a hypersensitivity reaction. If anaphylaxis or other hypersensitivity reaction occurs, stop administration of ACTEMRA immediately and discontinue ACTEMRA permanently. Do not administer ACTEMRA to patients with known hypersensitivity to ACTEMRA.

Anaphylaxis and other hypersensitivity reactions that required treatment discontinuation were reported in 0.1% (3 out of 2644) of patients in the 6-month controlled trials of intravenous ACTEMRA, 0.2% (8 out of 4009) of patients in the intravenous all-exposure RA population, 0.7% (8 out of 1068) in the subcutaneous 6-month controlled RA trials, and in 0.7% (10 out of 1465) of patients in the subcutaneous all-exposure population. In the SJIA controlled trial with intravenous ACTEMRA, 1 out of 112 patients (0.9%) experienced hypersensitivity reactions that required treatment discontinuation. In the PJIA controlled trial with intravenous ACTEMRA, 0 out of 188 patients (0%) in the ACTEMRA all-exposure population experienced hypersensitivity reactions that required treatment discontinuation.

Demyelinating Disorders

The impact of treatment with ACTEMRA on demyelinating disorders is not known, but multiple sclerosis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy were reported rarely in clinical studies. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of demyelinating disorders. Prescribers should exercise caution in considering the use of ACTEMRA in patients with preexisting or recent-onset demyelinating disorders.

Active Hepatic Disease and Hepatic Impairment

Treatment with ACTEMRA is not recommended in patients with active hepatic disease or hepatic impairment.

Vaccinations

Avoid use of live vaccines concurrently with ACTEMRA. No data are available on the secondary transmission of infection from persons receiving live vaccines to patients receiving ACTEMRA or on the effectiveness of vaccination in patients receiving ACTEMRA. Patients should be brought up to date on all recommended vaccinations prior to initiation of ACTEMRA therapy.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (RA)

The most common serious adverse reactions were serious infections. The most common serious infections included pneumonia, urinary tract infection, cellulitis, herpes zoster, gastroenteritis, diverticulitis, sepsis and bacterial arthritis. In the ACTEMRA-IV monotherapy clinical study, the rate of serious infections was 3.6 per 100 patient-years in the ACTEMRA group and 1.5 per 100 patient-years in the methotrexate group. The rate of serious infections in the 4 mg/kg and 8 mg/kg ACTEMRA plus DMARD groups was 4.4 and 5.3 events per 100 patient-years, respectively, compared to 3.9 events per 100 patient-years in the placebo plus DMARD group.

In the 5 Phase III clinical trials, the most common adverse reactions (≥5% of patients treated with ACTEMRA-IV) through 6 months were:

  ACTEMRA-IV
8 mg/kg
Monotherapy (%)
Methotrexate (%) ACTEMRA-IV
4 mg/kg
+ DMARDs (%)
ACTEMRA-IV
8 mg/kg
+ DMARDs (%)
Placebo
+ DMARDs (%)
URTI 7 5 6 8 6
Nasopharyngitis 7 6 4 6 4
Headache 7 2 6 5 3
Hypertension 6 2 4 4 3
Increased ALT 6 4 3 3 1

The safety observed for ACTEMRA administered subcutaneously was consistent with the known safety profile of intravenous ACTEMRA, with the exception of injection-site reactions, which were more common with ACTEMRA-SC compared with placebo-SC injections (IV-arm).

In the 6-month control period, in SC-I, the frequency of injection-site reactions was 10.1% (64/631) and 2.4% (15/631) for the weekly ACTEMRA-SC and placebo-SC (IV-arm) group, respectively. In SC-II, the frequency of injection-site reactions was 7.1% (31/437) and 4.1% (9/218) for the every other week ACTEMRA-SC and placebo-SC groups, respectively. These injection-site reactions were mild to moderate in severity. The majority resolved without any treatment and none necessitated drug discontinuation.

GIANT CELL ARTERITIS (GCA)

The overall safety profile observed in the ACTEMRA treatment groups was generally consistent with the known safety profile of ACTEMRA. There was an overall higher incidence of infections in GCA patients relative to RA patients.

Infections

The rate of infections was 200.2 per 100 patient-years in the ACTEMRA SC weekly group and 160.2 per 100 patient-years in the ACTEMRA SC every other week group, as compared to 156.0 per 100 patient-years in the placebo + 26 week prednisone taper and 210.2 per 100 patient-years in the placebo + 52 week taper groups.

The rate of serious infections was 9.7 per 100 patient-years in the ACTEMRA SC weekly group and 4.4 per 100 patient-years in the ACTEMRA SC every other week group, as compared to 4.2 per 100 patient-years in the placebo + 26 week prednisone taper and 12.5 per 100 patient-years in the placebo + 52 week prednisone taper groups.

POLYARTICULAR JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS (PJIA)

The most common adverse events seen in ACTEMRA-treated patients in the all-exposure population included: upper respiratory tract infections, headache, nasopharyngitis, and diarrhea.

Infections

The rate of infections in the ACTEMRA all-exposure population was 163.7 per 100 patient-years. The most common events observed were nasopharyngitis and upper respiratory tract infections. The rate of serious infections was numerically higher in patients weighing less than 30 kg treated with 10 mg/kg ACTEMRA (12.2 per 100 patient-years) compared to patients weighing at or above 30 kg, treated with 8 mg/kg ACTEMRA (4.0 per 100 patient-years). The incidence of infections leading to dose interruptions was also numerically higher in patients weighing less than 30 kg treated with 10 mg/kg ACTEMRA (21%) compared to patients weighing at or above 30 kg, treated with 8 mg/kg ACTEMRA (8%).

Infusion Reactions

In PJIA patients, infusion-related reactions are defined as all events occurring during or within 24 hours of an infusion. In the ACTEMRA all-exposure population, 11 patients (6%) experienced an event during the infusion, and 38 patients (20.2%) experienced an event within 24 hours of an infusion. The most common events occurring during infusion were headache, nausea and hypotension, and occurring within 24 hours of infusion were dizziness and hypotension. 

SYSTEMIC JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS (SJIA)

The most common adverse events (at least 5%) seen in ACTEMRA-treated patients in the 12-week controlled portion of the study were: upper respiratory tract infections, headache, nasopharyngitis, and diarrhea.

Infections

In the 12-week controlled phase, the rate of all infections in the ACTEMRA group was 345 per 100 patient-years and 287 per 100 patient-years in the placebo group. In the open-label extension over an average duration of 73 weeks of treatment, the overall rate of infections was 304 per 100 patient-years.

In the 12-week controlled phase, the rate of serious infections in the ACTEMRA group was 11.5 per 100 patient-years. In the open-label extension over an average duration of 73 weeks of treatment, the overall rate of serious infections was 11.4 per 100 patient-years. The most commonly reported serious infections included pneumonia, gastroenteritis, varicella, and otitis media.

Macrophage Activation Syndrome

In the 12-week controlled study, no patient in any treatment group experienced macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) while on assigned treatment; 3 per 112 (3%) developed MAS during open-label treatment with ACTEMRA. One patient in the placebo group escaped to ACTEMRA 12 mg per kg at Week 2 due to severe disease activity, and ultimately developed MAS at Day 70. Two additional patients developed MAS during the long-term extension. All 3 patients had ACTEMRA dose interrupted (2 patients) or discontinued (1 patient) for the MAS event, received treatment, and the MAS resolved without sequelae. Based on a limited number of cases, the incidence of MAS does not appear to be elevated in the ACTEMRA SJIA clinical development experience; however, no definitive conclusions can be made.

Infusion Reactions

In the 12-week controlled phase, 4% of ACTEMRA and 0% of placebo-treated patients experienced events occurring during infusion.

Within 24 hours after infusion, 16% of patients in the ACTEMRA treatment group and 5% of patients in the placebo group experienced an event. In the ACTEMRA group the events included rash, urticaria, diarrhea, epigastric discomfort, arthralgia, and headache. One of these events, urticaria, was considered serious.

Anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis was reported in 1 out of 112 patients (less than 1%) treated with ACTEMRA during the controlled and open-label extension study.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

In GCA patients, no effect of concomitant corticosteroid on ACTEMRA exposure was observed.

Cytochrome P450s in the liver are down-regulated by infection and inflammation stimuli including cytokines such as IL-6. Inhibition of IL-6 signaling in RA patients treated with ACTEMRA may restore CYP450 activities to higher levels than those in the absence of ACTEMRA leading to increased metabolism of drugs that are CYP450 substrates.

Exercise caution when coadministering ACTEMRA with CYP3A4 substrate drugs where decrease in effectiveness is undesirable, e.g., oral contraceptives, lovastatin, atorvastatin, etc.

USE IN PREGNANCY

There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to ACTEMRA during pregnancy. Physicians are encouraged to register patients and pregnant women are encouraged to register themselves by calling 1-877-311-8972.

The limited available data with ACTEMRA in pregnant women are not sufficient to determine whether there is a drug-associated risk for major birth defects and miscarriage.

You may report side effects to the FDA at (800) FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Genentech at (888) 835-2555.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNING, for additional important safety information.